Happening today …

19 05 2019

Maia; Temple Butte and McKenna Peak

A special dedication to a special lady.

Today in Disappointment Valley, we’re having a ceremony to dedicate Temple Butte in honor of our dear and much-missed friend – and friend of mustangs – Pati Temple.

Last year, just before Christmas, we learned that the U.S. Board of Geographic Names had granted our request to officially name Temple Butte. It was an arduous application process, and we are tremendously thankful to Ann Bond for her commitment to the paperwork and seeing it through to the successful end.

San Miguel County commissioners (Kris Holstrom, Hilary Cooper and Joan May) wrote a letter of support for our application, and we thank them, especially past and present members who knew Pati personally.

Pati worked tirelessly with local BLM employees to get things done for Spring Creek Basin’s herd, and Wayne Werkmeister, herd manager in the 1990s who played a vital role in the creation of the Colorado chapter of the National Mustang Association, wrote a letter of support for Temple Butte. He’s currently the associate field manager at the Grand Junction Field Office (out of which the Little Book Cliffs herd is managed). At Pati’s insistence (one of her best traits was her absolute refusal to take no for an answer!), Wayne was here for our 2011 (last) roundup, during which we implemented our PZP program.

Mike Jensen, current Spring Creek Basin herd manager who also knew Pati, had this to say: “I really see it as fitting to have that beautiful butte which looks down on the HMA named in honor of Pati. Her passion for those horses was a driving force in where we are today in the management of the HMA.”

During her many years of involvement with Spring Creek Basin and its mustangs, Pati made sure that we partnered with BLM instead of fighting with the agency. That philosophy continues … and look at the good it has generated for our mustangs!

Pati touched the lives of humans and animals alike during her life, and it is fitting for those of us who knew her to continue to advocate for all those who need a helping hand and a word of encouragement.

Thank you, Pati. Thank you to all who made this happen.





The best of green and blue

12 03 2019

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The little blue “square” in the middle is just east of McKenna Peak Wilderness Study Area (labeled), which is east of and in the eastern part of Spring Creek Basin Herd Management Area.

I’m wearing a smile as big and broad as lower Disappointment Valley. 🙂





Blessed are those who wait for rain

8 10 2018

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We’re not the most patient lot … but we just might be the most grateful. 🙂

Colorado Highway 141, across the top of the screen, runs across the broad, lower, northern end of Disappointment Valley. Southeast of the rightmost 141 marker and south of the open space in the green blob that is life-giving rain is Spring Creek Basin. The rain has fallen fairly steadily with small breaks since Saturday mid-afternoon.

The world as we know it is SOGGY. And it’s FABULOUS.





Bright girl

2 08 2018

Gaia; McKenna Peak

Copper Gaia is a glowing spot of color on a hazy, smoky day.





Colorful Temple

26 07 2018

Rainbow over Temple Butte

Only sprinkles over Spring Creek Basin, but we’ll take every one.





Drizzle

17 06 2018

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Grateful.

Some good news on the 416 Fire front from The Durango Herald.

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We kept getting little waves of drizzly dribbles during the day.

Sweet. So welcome. So desperately, very welcome.





Horse Park Fire now on Inciweb

31 05 2018

Skywalker; Horse Park Fire

Another link for ya’ll: The Horse Park Fire is on Inciweb.

The fire is at 1,240 acres and 50 percent contained! Two hundred seventy-two people are working on this fire, and we thank each and every one of them! They estimate containment by June 9.

The smoke was much reduced Wednesday, even from the last couple of days.

And more good news: We got a few drops of rain. 🙂 I think one of the fire reports said no rain fell over the fire, but it was cooler, and we had cloud cover. The weather is supposed to change (not for the better), so this hopefully gave firefighters a good day to make advances. The report note that the moisture in the dead logs in the fire area is about 3 percent; kiln-dried wood has about 15 percent moisture. Yikes.

It’s hard to overstate how terribly dry it is. Please, please, be careful.