More rain, frost, fog, sunshine!

10 12 2019

120919TempleButteMcKPeakfog1

The fog wasn’t nearly as heavy or as long-lasting this time as it was last time.

Also like last time, I couldn’t find a single cooperative pony to photograph!

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In other news:

The Bureau of Land Management seeks public comment on wild horse fertility control study.

Article about it in the Las Vegas Sun.

I’m not really sure what to think about this, let alone what to say about it. While BLM continues to search for and research various ways to limit or stop reproduction in wild horses and burros, the fact remains that PZP is a tried and true vaccine (with more than 30 years of research and use) to limit reproduction in horses and burros. PZP works where it’s used. When it’s used, PZP works. Why not use it? Why keep complaining that there’s nothing to do but round up and remove? Why wait to use what exists and works??

Yes, please: Continue to research other, *humane* ways of reducing fertility in wild horses and burros, ways that work longer and are “easier” to deploy (than native PZP).

But in the meantime, PZP WORKS. USE IT.

A very good, very effective tool exists. When it’s used, it works. When it’s not used, it’s difficult to listen to the complaints about the consequences of its lack of use.

I would love to offer support to another tool in the goal to reduce reproduction – in turn reducing the need for roundups and removals – and I really hope PZP would get the support and use our wild horses and burros deserve.

Disclaimer: We have used PZP in Spring Creek Basin since the roundup in 2011. We haven’t had a roundup since 2011, and no roundups are planned. Reason? PZP, plain and simple.

From BLM’s release at the link above:

A 15-day public comment period on the preliminary environmental assessment is set for December 5 – 19, 2019. The public is encouraged to review DOI-BLM-NV-0000-2020-001-EA (Oocyte Growth Factor Vaccine Study), located at: https://go.usa.gov/xpEvc and provide comments or concerns, prior to 4:30 p.m. (PST) on December 19, 2019. Comments and concerns may be emailed to blm_nv_nvso_research@blm.gov or sent in writing to the BLM Nevada State Office, Attention: Ruth Thompson, Wild Horse and Burro Project Coordinator, 1340 Financial Boulevard, Reno, NV 89502.

If you’re moved to comment, I would encourage readers to offer respectful comments that support continued research of humane fertility-control options. I also would encourage readers to point to the long-known success of PZP and encourage BLM to make use of it.





Shadow and light

6 09 2019

Shadow; Brumley Point and Temple Butte

Shadowlita again because, wary as she is, she does tend to get herself into positions that showcase some of Spring Creek Basin’s amazing horizons. 🙂 Here, Brumley Point and Temple Butte.





Green light

27 06 2019

Storm; Temple Butte and Brumley Point

Handsome boy in a beautiful landscape.





No exertion here

23 06 2019

Storm; Temple Butte and Brumley Point

Storm was napping in the cooler-than-usual summer sunshine, with his band grazing around him. I found a place to sit and watch (taking advantage of the spectacular background!), and every now and then, he’d come alert and look over, assure himself that all was well, then return to his nap.

Not too much bothers the big boy. 🙂





Meadow in the valley

17 06 2019

Maia and Alegre; Brumley Point and Temple Butte

Sorry about the technical difficulties! I can’t believe it posted any part of this post earlier, but this is the “meadow” in the greater valley – a beautiful gathering place recently. 🙂





Pretty as a picture

30 12 2018

Juniper; Brumley Point

Beautiful grey girl Juniper watches another band in the distance.

That’s Brumley Point in the distance behind her. It forms part of Spring Creek Basin’s southeastern boundary.





Evening water trek

3 12 2018

Tenaz; Brumley Point

There’s water in them there folds. Really. I promise. 🙂