Rain = gooooooooood!

30 07 2014

And we finally got rain …

County line drainage during the big flow.

This drainage coming out of Spring Creek Basin usually is wide and dry.  The water gap is in case of episodes such as this! The PVC pipe creates a visible barrier for the horses in the fence line, but it swings with the force of water when it flows. This pic was taken from the Disappointment Road looking northeast into the basin. The unnamed promontory is barely visible through rain at far back right. The horses already were taking advantage of the rain and running arroyos; three bands were to the east and north of this point.

County line drainage after the big flow.

A couple of hours later, the big flow was a memory. But I bet the memory lives on in the form of some ultra-full ponds!

Spring Creek during the surge from a massive rain event.

Here’s a shot of the usually-dry Spring Creek arroyo that runs under the Disappointment Road in the northern part of the valley – west of Spring Creek Basin. In the background, you can see the rimrocks that form the basin’s western boundary and beyond, the unnamed promontory. (Yes, that’s dreaded tamarisk along the left bank of the creek.)

Spring Creek after the surge.

And this is Spring Creek a coupla-few hours later after the above peak. Still high but receding.

The above two pix of Spring Creek are together for comparison purposes. The below two photos were taken inside Spring Creek Basin after the first of those two photos were taken.

Spring Creek flowing high and wide through Spring Creek Basin.

This is the entrance to Spring Creek canyon – site of previous roundups. Spring Creek flows west out of Spring Creek Basin after collecting water from multiple arroyos and drainages in the basin and eventually joins Disappointment Creek, which joins the Dolores River, which joins the Colorado River. Cool, huh? Spring Creek flows only during major rain events like the one today. Spring Creek and Spring Creek Basin are not interchangeable terms.

Spring Creek flowing high and wide through Spring Creek Basin.

Looking upstream, sort of east-southeast. It was raining when I took these photos, so I didn’t stay long.

Rain. Lifeblood of the desert and its inhabitants. I cry at its lack, and I cry for joy when it falls. My heart is happy for Spring Creek Basin’s mustangs and other residents.





Grey and dark(er grey)

29 07 2014

Houdini and Maia

Houdini and Maia run with the wind on a cool day in Spring Creek Basin.

It was *trying* to rain. Two big curtains of rain already had passed, and a third was forming. Some ground was damp the first time I walked over it … but dry on second passing. I think parts of the basin other than where we/I were/was got a nice shower. Briefly, the wind was out of the north, and it was cool and divine.





He’s golden

28 07 2014

Grey

Stunning stallion, stunning light. A shining light in a sometimes-not-so-great world.





Red and dark

27 07 2014

Gaia and Cassidy Rain

Pretty Gaia and her dark daughter, Cassidy Rain, on a hot ‘n dusty day in Spring Creek Basin.





Boy howdy

24 07 2014

Tenaz playing with Hayden.

In the bike-repair business, many great customer stories start off like this: “I was just riding along when …” Having worked at a bike shop, I heard plenty of those stories. As a bike rider, I told plenty of those stories.

So the Spring Creek Basin version goes like this: I was just sitting on a rock under a tree in the shade, hiding from the hot, hot, HOT sunshine, when the magic of the wild decided I was in the right place, and it was the right time. Whew.

Although it looks like handsome Tenaz is waving hello, his attention is all on Hayden, out of the frame to the left. 🙂





Just a look

23 07 2014

Cassidy Rain, Gaia and Storm

No spaghetti necessary. 🙂 Storm grazes with two of his lovely ladies, Gaia and Cassidy Rain, on a hot, hot afternoon.





Gilded

22 07 2014

Mariah

Mariah at sunset in a field of amber-waving grain. She’s just kissed with a little light at the very end of the day.